All posts by darkroomgazer

Annie Frame

My friend Annie is a really rad photographer. Ya’ll should check out her work!
http://annieframe.com/


Extreme Sheeping!


Apparently I’m really late to this party. But this is SO GOOD!

Futurama Mashup

Here’s the Futurama mashup I did this week for Comedy Central.
I’m just happy I got to watch Futurama all day long, for work! (This was immediately followed by watching a bunch of Star Trek: The Next Generation at home on my couch. I am not ashamed.)

Enjoy!

Grammy Nominations

The 2011 Grammy Nominations were announced today! All Is Not Lost is nominated for Best Short Form Music Video. I’m over the moon about this. Congratulations to everyone who I had the pleasure to work on this with.

Animal

I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Animal the Muppet today. He was at the house for band practice. I think I actually turned into a giddy 5 year old.

When I asked to have a picture taken with him, he called me a groupy. I was honored.

In honor of all things Jim Henson, here is a link to a short film Jim Henson did in 1964. I stumbled upon it while reading idsgn.

You can go see Jim Henson’s Fantastic World exhibit at the Museum of Moving Image in NYC. The show is up until January 16, 2012

LA LA Land


(this is a cool video)

I’ve begun the grand journey into splitting my time between Los Angeles and New York City. Though, for the next few months it’s going to be mostly LA.

If you’ve been around me at all in the last month or so, you know, all I can talk about is the difference between NYC and LA, how I don’t know which I like more and how I need to make the city of LA my friend the way NYC is my friend.

So, in an effort to understand LA, I’ve been doing a little research and have stumbled upon some pretty good stuff.

First off you should watch The Cool School documentary about the Ferus Gallery and the inception of the (for lack of a better description) pop art gallery scene in LA.

One of the things I’ve really been trying to figure out is where to get good coffee. I’ve been thoroughly spoiled by Variety Coffee Shop in Brooklyn. My addiction to Stumptown Coffee has not subsided since I’ve been in LA. Luckily, the NYTimes T Magazine solved all my problems for me by publishing this article about all the great coffee shops in the area.

On a completely separate note, here is my “Awesome Video of the Day” selection:

Dear Canada, Can we work together please? Thanks, Paula

Complexions at Summerstage

A few weeks ago we interviewed Desmond Richardson and Dwight Roden before their performance at SummerStage 2010. This video is the first home4dance video to get over 1,000 plays in the first day.

photo archive #1

I’ve decided to dedicate one day a week to a few photos from my archive of photos. Some of them have been out in the interweb before, some have not, but they are all photos that I really enjoy. I hope you do too.

In the Shadow of the Mahabura

In the shadow of the Mahabura volcano lies Kisoro, Uganda. A village on the border of Rwanda and The Congo. The communities here live off well-manicured mountains, cultivating beans, sweet potatoes, and sorghum. It is one of the most fertile areas of Uganda because of the minerals from the volcanic soil. However, in recent years, unpredictable weather events and inconsistent rainfall have hurt harvests in the area.

When I was there in September 2009 the rain was just beginning to fall in Kisoro. In past years by September, the rainy season would have been in full swing. In order to adapt to the changing seasonal calendar, the women, who bear the brunt of this work, have had to work longer and harder to control the outcome of the harvests.

According to the 2009 UNFPA State of World Population report:

Drought and erratic rainfall force women to work harder to secure food, water and energy for their homes. Girls drop out of school to help their mothers with these tasks. This cycle of deprivation, poverty and inequality undermines the social capital needed to deal effectively with climate change.

While walking through the well-manicured hillsides of Kisoro, you only find women and children working the fields. It is rare to find a man.

Stella was born and raised in a subcounty not far from Kisoro. She, like many women, is hired to cultivate other people’s land. She is 60 and has 3 children, most of them going to school. On the day I met Stella she and her daughter had been working in a small garden since daybreak. Even though she also has her own small family plot, most days she works on other’s fields to make a living. She says this is the only way she can earn money to support her family. On a good day, she can make between 3,000 and 4,000 Ugandan Shillings (equivalent to $1.50-2.00).

Stella says she would rather work independently than work in a collective. Working in a collective is another option for women to earn money working the fields. Landowners who have larger plots will hire a group of 20-40 women to till, prepare and plant their land. These women do not get paid daily or weekly but at the end of the planting season. Usually, these women get paid a slightly higher wage than those who work independently. But sometimes they don’t get paid at all.